Cyberbullying

Imagine a classmate posts a photo of themselves online. Someone else makes a mean, mocking comment about the photo. Soon, that photo has been shared, liked, reposted—even made into a meme. Thousands of people have seen it, even people the person being targeted doesn’t know. That’s why cyberbullying can be extra hurtful: it’s public, it spreads quickly, and it’s 24/7.

Kids on Social Media and Gaming

Digital media and apps allow children to communicate and express their creativity, connect with peers, and share their feelings. However, they can be an avenue through which cyberbullying occurs. There are many types of apps and sites available for free that give users the ability to search for people and share or post information about them anonymously.

Parents may not be aware of the apps that their children use regularly or may not be aware of the risks involved in using them. There are many ways that cyberbullying can be hidden in apps and sites, such as texts, videos, and web calls that disappear or do not appear on the device’s call or text message logs.

Who Is at Risk

No single factor puts a child at risk of being bullied or bullying others. Bullying can happen anywhere—cities, suburbs, or rural towns. Depending on the environment, some groups—such as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or questioning (LGBTQ) youth, youth with disabilities, and socially isolated youth—may be at an increased risk of being bullied.

Digital Awareness for Parents

The digital world is constantly evolving with new social media platforms, apps, and devices, and children and teens are often the first to use them. Some negative things that may occur include cyberbullying, sexting, posting hateful messages or content, and participating in negative group conversations. If your child posts harmful or negative content online, it may not only harm other children; it can affect their online reputation, which can have negative implications for their employment or college admission.

Internet Safety Tips for Teens – Helpful AND Funny

Teens today live a huge portion of their lives online. In fact, according to a study from Pew Research Center, 92 percent of teens report going online daily—including 24 percent who say they go online “almost constantly.” Why so much online activity? The accessibility of smartphones, of course. Fully 91 percent of teens go online from mobile devices at least occasionally. Among these “mobile teens,” 94 percent go online daily or more often. That’s a lot of time spent looking at a screen. Just like you want your teen to stay safe in school and at the mall, you need to be sure they’re being smart about how they handle themselves online

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